''First organization in the world which provides accredited certification for pharmaceutical industry professionals'' by Dr. William A. Soliman, Founder and CEO, ACMA

“I think we're going to see more examples where technology, especially medical devices, are going to play a bigger role in drug delivery and mechanism for treating chronic diseases,” says Dr. William A. Soliman, Founder, and CEO, ACMA.

Medical Affairs teams within the pharmaceutical, biotech, and medical device companies may be charged with the following: Managing relationships with key thought leaders and stakeholders, relaying and providing clinical knowledge gained from trials to health care professionals and stakeholders. 

Dr. William A. Soliman, Founder, and CEO, ACMA which has the first-ever Prior Authorization Certification program and also offers staffing for Medical information departments. 

Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs (ACMA) provides data & tech solutions for Medical Affairs and the MSL space in the life sciences industry. 

ACMA - first organization in the world to provide accredited certification for pharma

Dr. William explains, “So the Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs (ACMA) is the first organization in the world which provides accredited certification for pharmaceutical industry professionals. We offer certification for reimbursement specialists that work in the industry and we actually started by developing the first-ever and the only accredited until now, board certification for medical affairs professionals and medical science liaison. And we also now offer digital tools and technology for the pharmaceutical industry. So you have the ACMA engage, which is for a CRM tool for medical affairs and MSL professionals and also ACMA predicts, which is our own proprietary predictive analytics tool for the pharmaceutical industry to help them gather insights and analytics on their stakeholder, though very exciting time here at the ACMA,” he says.

Medical affairs is a really important role

Dr. William explains, “Especially when you think about COVID-19, and the apprehension that many people around the world take about taking the vaccine, for example, really boils down to trust in the pharmaceutical industry. The entire world is affected by Coronavirus and so medical affairs, in particular, are a really important role because ultimately the face of the pharmaceutical industry and educating the medical community on the products and the services that the industry provides. And so I'm sure for Coronavirus, medical liaisons, medical affairs professionals are going to play a big part in educating the community whether it's the physician community, whether it's the patient advocates patient community, about the safety of vaccines and why they shouldn't be using the vaccines. This is going to be very important. We just had a meeting with some of the vaccine manufacturers and these are the other things that we talked about the ACMA with many policymakers many Congress in the United States government, which are part of the Trump administration in the White House staff as well as and the FDA and these are very important points around the issue of professional standards and this brings me back to why accredited certification for MSL and medical affairs is so important more than ever, get people certified and meeting a minimum standard because you need to go trust among the people world,” he says.

The biggest challenge is a visual technology

Dr. William sheds light on the subject, “I think the key challenges in medical affairs in the next 10 to 15 years are going to be a few things. The first one is defining how a medical affair is going to be able to be effective in the new digital era. Today, in medical affairs, we are beginning to adopt a lot of digital technology in the last few years, but as we step into the world of big data analytics and healthcare. How will medical affairs use this technology and tools? Like I mentioned, we have predictive analytics and AI, how will we use that to make better strategic decisions? How will we just help our organizations be able to anticipate changes in the market and anticipate what we can look forward to when it comes to even the regulatory elements and drug approval, that predictive analytics plays a role at all. So I think that's going to be the biggest challenge is visual technology. I think the other area is especially since Coronavirus, now we're all virtual so how are we going to continue to build relationships with stakeholders and external communities in this new paradigm because even after Coronavirus is over, I think a lot of people are still going to want to be remote and virtual. How are we going to work in the medical liaison today even before Coronavirus they spent a lot of their time? Another thing is traveling to Europe, what are you going to do with the reimbursement specialist that we work with for certifying on prior authorization? The landscape is different from doctors today. They might prefer to meet virtually so how will we as an industry adopt that? So I think that relates to medical affairs. But in general, I think the industry is thinking about what this is going to mean for this generation of physicians and health care providers,” he says.

Coronavirus ushered in a new era of Telemedicine 

Dr. William shares his thoughts, “Absolutely. I do think Coronavirus ushered in a more quickly a new era and one of the biggest areas is telemedicine. They think about how many appointments that you had with your doctor, whether it's for yourself or for your children, where you're able to do it on a zoom. That was unheard of years ago or even a year ago, I think that reimbursement models for health care providers are going to change. I think that also when it comes to the delivery, the drug delivery of drugs and devices, that's going to change as well. What I mean by that is you're living in an environment where there is less face to face interactions and it's virtual, I think we're going to see greater use and focus of drugs that are delivered less frequently. So you are virtual and are able to use devices, for example, to administer, let's say drugs for diabetes that's already happening now where maybe, you only administer through the implanted device for patients with diabetes and it’s done once a year, and that regulates your insulin that I've taken every day and medication for diabetes. I think we're going to see more examples where technology, especially medical devices, are going to play a bigger role in drug delivery and mechanism for treating chronic diseases,” he says.

(Edited by Rabia Mistry Mulla)

 

Contributed By: Dr. William A. Soliman, Founder, and CEO, ACMA 
Tags : #healthcare #healthtech #chronicdiseases #ACMA #DrWilliamSoliman #AccreditionCouncilforMedicalAffairs #medicaldevices #covid19 #rendezvous

About the Author


Rabia Mistry Mulla

'For vessels to change their course, they have to be hit by a strong wind first!'
So here I am penning down my thoughts on health and research after 6 years of planning Diets.
Being a Clinical Dietitian & a Diabetes Educator I always had a thing for writing, alas, been hit by the winds towards a new course!
You can write to me at [email protected]

Related Stories

Loading Please wait...
-Advertisements-


Trending Now

It is important to adopt a non-judgmental attitude towards any teenage girl seeking contraceptive advise suggests Dr. Teena Trivedi, Obstetrician and GynecologistApril 16, 2021
80% of the diseases are psychosomatic which means they have roots in the mind and this is where homeopathy steps in - It resolves physical ailments by finding the cause in the mind – Dr. Sanket Dhuri, Consultant Homeopath April 14, 2021
A futuristic Vision of a Healthcare Entrepreneur: Shyatto Raha, CEO, and Founder of MyHealthcareApril 12, 2021
Saher Mehdi, Founder and Chief Scientist at wellOwise talks about aspects making healthcare more equitable and reachableApril 10, 2021
Wide variety of therapies to address autism in children explained by Dr. Shilpa Jasubhai, Clinical PsychologistApril 09, 2021
Allopathic and Homeopathic medicines should not be taken together says Dr. Sunil Mehra, Homeopath ConsultantApril 08, 2021
The charm of homeopathic medicine is that it can be taken with conventional medicines – Dr. Shruthi Shridhar, Consulting Homeopath April 08, 2021
Dissociative Identity Disorder and associated concepts explained by Dr. Vinod Kumar, Psychiatrist and Head of Mpower - The Centre (Bangalore) April 07, 2021
Dissociative Identity Disorder explained by Dr. Shilpa Jasubhai, Clinical PsychologistApril 05, 2021
Sehat Ki Baat, Karishma Ke Saath- Episode 6 Healthy Diet For Boosting Metabolism Which Can Help Thyroid Patients April 03, 2021
Significant Pointers on Kidney Health by Dr. Santosh Waigankar, Consultant Urooncologist and Robotic Surgeon at Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani HospitalApril 01, 2021
Dr. Vaishal Kenia, Ophthalmologist Talks About the Different Possibilities Available for the Treatment of Glaucoma Depending Upon Their Type and SeverityMarch 30, 2021
No Definitive Role of Diet in Treatment of Lymphedema but Intake of Calories, Salt and Long Chain Fatty Acids should be controlled says Dr. Ramani CVMarch 30, 2021
Dr. Kiran Chandra Patro, Senior Nephrologist Talks About Dialysis as the Temporary Process and Not a Permanent Cure for the Patients of Renal DysfunctionMarch 30, 2021
Two out of three new chronic kidney disease patients are found to have diabetes or hypertension informs Dr. Sreeharsha HarinathaMarch 30, 2021
Glaucoma Treatment: Medications or Surgery? A valuable piece of advice from Dr. Pranay Kapdia, Chairman and Medical Director of Kapadia Eye CareMarch 25, 2021
Dr. Shraddha Satav, Consultant Ophthalmologist Recommends that Everybody After 40, Should Go for the Complete Eye Checkup at Regular IntervalMarch 25, 2021
Childhood Obesity is not a Disease but a Condition which can be very well ManagedMarch 19, 2021
World Sleep Day - 19 th March 2021- Know More About Healthy Sleep As Per The Guidelines by The World Sleep Society March 19, 2021
Sipping Warm Water, the First Thing in the Morning is Good for DigestionMarch 18, 2021