USFDA approves drug to reduce bone marrow suppression caused by chemotherapy

▴ USFDA approves drug to reduce bone marrow suppression caused by chemotherapy
The new drug will give patients a treatment option that can reduce the occurrence of a common, harmful side effect of chemotherapy

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Cosela (trilaciclib) as the first therapy in its class to reduce the frequency of chemotherapy-induced bone marrow suppression in adults receiving certain types of chemotherapy for extensive-stage (when the cancer has spread beyond the lungs) small cell lung cancer. Cosela may help protect bone marrow cells from damage caused by chemotherapy by inhibiting cyclin- dependent kinase 4/6, a type of enzyme.

"For patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer, protecting bone marrow function may help make their chemotherapy safer and allow them to complete their course of treatment on time and according to plan," said Albert Deisseroth, M.D., PhD., supervisory medical officer in the Division of Non-Malignant Hematology in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "Today's approval of Cosela will give patients a treatment option that can reduce the occurrence of a common, harmful side effect of chemotherapy."

Chemotherapy drugs are designed to kill cancer cells but can damage normal tissues as well. The bone marrow is particularly susceptible to chemotherapy damage. The bone marrow makes red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets (small fragments in the blood) that transport oxygen, fight infection, and stop bleeding. When damaged, the bone marrow produces fewer of these cells, leading to fatigue, increased risk of infection, and bleeding, among other problems. Cosela may help protect the normal bone marrow cells from the harmful effects of chemotherapy.

The effectiveness of Cosela was evaluated in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Combined, these studies randomly assigned 245 patients to receive either an infusion of Cosela in their veins or a placebo before chemotherapy. The studies then compared the two groups for the proportion of patients with severe neutropenia (a very low count of white blood cells called neutrophils) and the duration of severe neutropenia in the first cycle of chemotherapy. In all three studies, patients who received Cosela had a lower chance of having severe neutropenia compared to patients who received a placebo. Among those who had severe neutropenia, patients who received Cosela, on average, had it for a shorter time than patients who received a placebo.

The most common side effects of Cosela include fatigue; low levels of calcium, potassium and phosphate; increased levels of an enzyme called aspartate aminotransferase; headache; and infection in the lungs (pneumonia).

Patients should also be advised about injection site reactions, acute drug hypersensitivity, interstitial lung disease/pneumonitis (lung tissue inflammation) and embryo-fetal toxicity.

Tags : #Chemotherapy #Bone-Marrow #LatestMedicineonCancerTreatment #SmallLungCancer #SideEffectsofChemotherapy #HowtoReduceSideEffectsofChemotherapy

About the Author


Team Medicircle

Related Stories

Loading Please wait...

-Advertisements-




Trending Now

How a Fiber-Rich Diet and Gut Parasites Can Improve Your HealthJuly 16, 2024
LinkedIn: A Double-Edged Sword for Professional GrowthJuly 16, 2024
Food Safety and Drug Administration (FDA), Uttarakhand, National Association of Street Vendors of India (NASVI) and Nestlé India expand Project ‘Serve Safe Food’ in Uttarakhand July 16, 2024
IIT Kharagpur and University of Leeds Sign MoU for Joint Supervision of PhD ProgramsJuly 16, 2024
Puja Curtains go up with KHUTI PUJA at Hazra Park DurgotsabJuly 16, 2024
Algorand and SEWA Join Forces to Launch Digital Health Passport Initiative for Women's EmpowermentJuly 15, 2024
The Debate Over Menstrual Leave: Balancing Needs and Workplace EqualityJuly 15, 2024
Young Indians Face Higher Lung Cancer Risk: Insights and ImplicationsJuly 15, 2024
Honoring a Healthcare Pioneer: Indian-origin Dr. George Matthew's Legacy in the UAEJuly 15, 2024
The Role of Platelets and Monocytes: New Research InsightsJuly 13, 2024
Groundbreaking Discovery in Cancer Research: Over 5,000 Genetic Variations IdentifiedJuly 13, 2024
June 2024: The Hottest Month on Record and What It Means for Our PlanetJuly 13, 2024
Cambodia Angkor Air teams up with Çelebi India for Cargo OperationsJuly 12, 2024
QUOTE ON UNION BUDGET EXPECTATIONS JULY 2024July 12, 2024
Empowering Consumers with Nutritional Information: FSSAI's New Labeling GuidelinesJuly 12, 2024
Innovative Migraine Research Uncovers Key Triggers and Pathways for PainJuly 12, 2024
Alarming Rise in Death's Due to HIV Among Students in Tripura: Urgent Need for ActionJuly 12, 2024
Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham is All Set to Produce Netravaad, an Innovative Technology for Speech Impairment July 11, 2024
Twice-Yearly Injection Shows 100% HIV Protection in Young WomenJuly 11, 2024
AIMS (Asian Hospital) Doctors Restore Disfigured Face of Road Accident VictimJuly 10, 2024